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About to Sell Your Home
When you sell your home your legal representative should carry out what’s known as “conveyancing”. Within the conveyancing industry the Law Society use a “CON 29 Form” which requires Building Regulations Compliance Certificates (which includes Part P – electrical compliance) to be provided. If they are not available when it’s clear they should be then you are at risk ok of both delaying the sale of your house and devaluing it during price negotiation. You will may be asked to pay for the required surveys (by your local Building Control department) to ascertain if the work that has been done complies with the appropriate Building Regulations – including them organising an EICR by a qualified Electrician – if you don’t pay for this directly.

Landlords
I’m sure that as a professional Landlord reading this you already know your property insurance policy backwards, the terms probably say something like “a copy of a valid Electrical Certificate or EICR must be provided” or it might go further “a copy of a valid Electrical Certificate or EICR must be provided on every change of tenancy”. The valid bit is because all electrical circuits degrade over time and an electrician thinks that it is only safe up to a certain date – with respect to his test / inspection results.
However, what you can’t account for is hidden (or otherwise) damage caused by previous tenants.

Finally, I refer you to my electrical safety page where I talk about the quarterly testing of RCD’s – Have you made it clear in your tenancy agreement who is responsible for pressing the “test” button on a quarterly basis?
My video which refers to RCBO’s but RCD’s have the same test button.

I offer no answer here as to WHO IS LEGALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR QUATERLY RCD TESTING IN A TENANCY AGREEMENT, but an EICR on every change of tenant is advisable.

Tenants
For your peace of mind and own safety you may want to ask your landlord for a copy of the valid EICR. Your contents policy may actually ask for it in order for your insurance to remain valid – or at least you could tell your landlord that your insurance company has requested it in order for your contents to be covered in the event of an electrical fire.

Finally, is it clear in your tenancy agreement who is responsible for pressing the RCD test buttons on a quarterly basis?
I offer no answer here as to WHO IS LEGALLY RESPONSIBLE FOR QUATERLY RCD TESTING IN A TENANCY AGREEMENT, but my video which refers to RCBO’s (RCD’s have the same test button) will help show you how to do it.

     
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